Things You Can Omit in an MVP

Most software ventures fail and they fail because they never solved a problem, to begin with. The Internet has made it easier than ever to start a software business but, at the same time, made it too enticing to create a product that no one needs. For that reason, it’s only rational to first test the waters with a Minimal Viable Product—a reduced subset of a full-blown software. As the well-reasoned logic goes, if people are ready to pay for your rough-and-ready product, there’s decent chance you’re heading in the right direction.


You Stop Craving for the Perfect Working Environment

I have always delayed buying furniture. The act of buying sizeable things induces a feeling of acquiring a burden that will affect my relocation freedom. For a considerable time, I didn’t have a table in my room. I worked on the bed with my Macbook during this time. It wasn’t awful but mentally, I made it be.


Contradictory Startup Advice

There isn’t any established science that categorically nails the process of creating a startup (I have used “startup” to refer an Internet business of any scale). However, there are pointers from founders who did it successfully and cautious lessons from those who failed. Be it marketing, sales, hiring, or making business decisions, every area pertaining to startups has been meticulously covered in books, podcasts, courses, and articles.


Why Programmers Should Automate More

Last week, I created a small script to aid my workflow which left me wondering why I didn’t make it earlier. It adds an option in Finder’s context menu to start a static web server in any folder which makes it easier to preview static websites. Technically, it’s equivalent to firing up the terminal, cding to the directory, and using one of the many options to create a static server. The convenience of doing in one step which took three is minor, but automating the process is also advantageous in secondary ways. The crucial benefit is removing the tedious chunk—even if a small one—of my work. I can take pride in how my real work won’t include time to get a static server running.