Things You Can Omit in an MVP Jun 2017

Most software ventures fail and they fail because they never solved a problem, to begin with. The Internet has made it easier than ever to start a software business but, at the same time, made it too enticing to create a product that no one needs. For that reason, it’s only rational to first test the waters with a Minimal Viable Product—a reduced subset of a full-blown software. As the well-reasoned logic goes, if people are ready to pay for your rough-and-ready product, there’s decent chance you’re heading in the right direction.

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Contradictory Startup Advice May 2017

There isn’t any established science that categorically nails the process of creating a startup (I have used “startup” to refer an Internet business of any scale). However, there are pointers from founders who did it successfully and cautious lessons from those who failed. Be it marketing, sales, hiring, or making business decisions, every area pertaining to startups has been meticulously covered in books, podcasts, courses, and articles.

One would think that the vastly accessible material has helped the likelihood of startup success. Maybe it has but there is hardly any evidence to corroborate that claim. Most Internet ventures still fail; most before getting any significant traction. What do we make of that? Why following the footsteps of successful founders remains failure-prone?

Maybe because building a startup is not as straightforward. It’s an antithesis of Anna Karenina Principle which suggests that the reasons behind unhappy families are numerous, whereas happy families have predictable things working for them. Obversely, successful startups succeed in their own way, while failed ventures are almost alike. It would be a glaring oversimplification but we can reduce startup failures to two reasons —

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