Things You Can Omit in an MVP

Most software ventures fail and they fail because they never solved a problem, to begin with. The Internet has made it easier than ever to start a software business but, at the same time, made it too enticing to create a product that no one needs. For that reason, it’s only rational to first test the waters with a Minimal Viable Product—a reduced subset of a full-blown software. As the well-reasoned logic goes, if people are ready to pay for your rough-and-ready product, there’s decent chance you’re heading in the right direction.


Contradictory Startup Advice

There isn’t any established science that categorically nails the process of creating a startup (I have used “startup” to refer an Internet business of any scale). However, there are pointers from founders who did it successfully and cautious lessons from those who failed. Be it marketing, sales, hiring, or making business decisions, every area pertaining to startups has been meticulously covered in books, podcasts, courses, and articles.


It Didn't Work Out

My SaaS attempt didn’t work out. So another failure story? Should I write a bucket list of lessons to be learned, things that went wrong? Well, I could but honestly, there are no apparent reasons for it not working — I mean you could think of various issues but it’s hard to imagine if winding the clock back would put me in a better place about what I was trying — maybe it’ll or maybe it won’t. Here, ‘it’ refers to Blipmetrics, a SaaS application that I was trying to build for content marketers but I failed short of building any momentum with it. “It’s niche, it’s focused, that would have a visible impact on my success”, I thought but it didn’t carry much effect.


Never Underestimate the Power of Creating Something Useless

We conceived the idea of “Bouncelytics” as a small analytics tool to help people understand their bounced visitors I saw many blogs mentioning how bounce rate wasn’t a useful metrics since it didn’t account for the time spent on the page. As lean guys, we set-up our landing page with what we were planning to build and posted it wherever we could. We got about 170+ sign-ups and we were terribly excited about having so many people interested in our product. I always liked the idea of a small product with minimal overhead that pays the bills and frees you to do anything else. This idea seemed like a ticket to freedom. Everyone saw the product as “interesting”. We started working together after quitting our jobs (not a big deal since I had months of savings and I always wanted to build something of my own).